Clutch Cargo: The Cartoon Designed Specifically to Ignite Nightmares

Clutch Cargo: The Cartoon Designed Specifically to Ignite Nightmares

Back in the 1960s and 1970s a mostly animated cartoon was aired that, as far as I can tell, was intended to give children nightmares and make them more controllable by their parents. Consider it the Boogeyman effect: “If you kids don’t do as I say, the Boogeyman will get you.” This particular cartoon was the single most disturbing thing I have seen in the world of children’s animated programming in my entire life; or at least until anime came to America. The show was called Clutch Cargo and I cannot help but feel it might have been the brainchild of one of those demented ex-Nazis that simpleton Harry Truman allowed to live a life of luxury in the United States immediately following World War II.

Clutch Cargo was begun in the late 1950s and premiered in 1960 and was notable only for one particular distinction. The stories were pedestrian and the animation itself was crude even for 1960. The way that Clutch Cargo managed to stick out from the crowd, and in the process become the stuff of nightmares for generations of young kids, was that there was one particular element of the animation of the faces on the show that were left non-animated. While the entire rest of the show was animated, for some reason the lips speaking the words were real. An actual human mouth replaced the animated mouth. If you don’t remember Clutch Cargo or you have never seen the not-nearly-as-creepy parody done regularly by Conan O’Brien, then click here to see for yourself exactly why this cartoon replaced vampires and werewolves and communists in the nightmares of kids living in the 1960s. cek tarif indah cargo logistik

It is quite possible that Clutch Cargo was responsible for the rampant growth of drug use among brain-dead hippies of the late 1960s. After all, it is entirely possible to believe that idiots like Timothy Leary and his moronic teenage followers who had happened to come upon an episode of Clutch Cargo wanted desperately to achieve the state of surreal fear that is engendered by the show. Of course, any intelligent person would merely have made an appointment with Clutch Cargo, but nobody ever said that drug users are intelligent. Just the opposite, actually.

Why anyone would want to put actual human lips onto the face of an animated character is one of the great mysteries of life that may never be answered; like why anybody would think Leonard DiCaprio is the perfect choice to play Vladimir Lenin, Teddy Roosevelt and Howard Hughes. The human lips on a cartoon face technique was a new invention that came to be known as Synchro-Vox. It was invented and patented by Edwin Gillette. It has been used most recently in several episodes of SpongeBob Squarepants, as well as in one of the extra features on the DVD of The Incredibles. Synchro-Vox is just as disturbing now as it was during its use on Clutch Cargo, although so far no new usage has quite reached that epic level sinister creepiness.